UBMD News

Our work gets us noticed. UBMD physicians make headlines for raising the bar on clinical care, leading community health initatives and conducting groundbreaking research, among other advancements and accomplishments.

2/22/19

Gil I. Wolfe, MD, UB Distinguished Professor and Irvin and Rosemary Smith Chair of the Department of Neurology, has been elected president of the New York State Neurological Society (NYSNS).

2/19/19

Eight medical students from the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences spent their winter break sharpening fundamental skills while seeing hundreds of patients in a makeshift clinic in rural Haiti.

2/18/19

University at Buffalo researchers have developed a tool that lets medical professionals analyze images without engineering expertise. 

2/15/19

Research by Gil I. Wolfe, MD, UB Distinguished Professor and Irvin and Rosemary Smith Chair of the Department of Neurology, shows that surgery to remove the thymus gland in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) provides significant clinical benefits for as long as five years after the procedure.

2/14/19

A trainee in the orthopaedic residency program is principal investigator on a study that has received a 2019 Resident Research Grant from the Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation.

2/12/19

Gil I. Wolfe, MD, Irvin and Rosemary Smith Chair of the Department of Neurology, has been elected president of the New York State Neurological Society (NYSNS). 

2/11/19

Jun-Xu Li, MD, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, is being recognized by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET) with the inaugural JH Woods Early Career Award in Behavioral Pharmacology.

 

2/6/19

In the Department of Orthopaedics, a current trainee and a recent graduate of the residency program each have received recognition for their first-author studies.

2/4/19

The study is the first randomized clinical trial of a treatment in the acute phase after a sport-related concussion.

1/25/19

Surgery to remove the thymus gland in patients with myasthenia gravis  provides significant clinical benefits for as long as five years after the procedure, according to a paper published in The Lancet Neurology.