UBMD News

Our work gets us noticed: UBMD physicians make headlines for raising the bar on clinical care, leading community health initatives and conducting groundbreaking research, among other accomplishments.

2/22/18

Department of Orthopaedics researchers have published a study that finds there is no statistically significant difference in clinical outcomes after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy among normal weight and obese patients.

2/22/18

Bianca Weinstock-Guttman, widely known as a leading expert on MS in adults and children, is the executive director of the New York State Multiple Sclerosis Consortium.

2/21/18

The first blood test to help doctors diagnose traumatic brain injuries has won Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval, but misconceptions abound about what it can accomplish.

2/21/18

Thirteen faculty members with a variety of research and clinical experience — representing six medical school departments — have joined the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences over the past several months.

2/15/18

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS) has funded two separate projects led by researchers in the departments of Neurology and Pharmacology and Toxicology.

2/8/18

Physicians in the Department of Emergency Medicine have implemented a new protocol for treating out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in Western New York that has more than doubled the patient survivor rate.

2/7/18

Differences in skull shape and function across carnivorans stem not just from diet, as has long been observed, but also from a range of environmental factors.

2/6/18

UB internal medicine residents have been selected to receive one of 30 grants issued nationally by the ACGME’s Back to Bedside program, which was developed to address some of the challenges facing medical residents today.

2/6/18

Three Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences faculty members performed surgeries that were broadcast live to the Vascular Interventional Advances (VIVA) Conference in Las Vegas.

2/2/18

A new study led by vision researchers has demonstrated that the addition of widely available antioxidants to the current standard-of-care prevented vision loss in an animal model of a rare genetic disease.