UBMD News

Our work gets us noticed. UBMD physicians make headlines for raising the bar on clinical care, leading community health initatives and conducting groundbreaking research, among other advancements and accomplishments.

6/24/19

Sanjay Sethi, MD, professor of medicine and assistant vice president for health sciences, has received the 2019 Stockton Kimball Award for outstanding scientific achievement and service.

6/21/19

A team of Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences entrepreneurs is launching a new company to solve problems that surgeons experience firsthand.

6/19/19
There are different types of dementia, each needing its own treatment plan based on the individual.
6/18/19

Oscar G. Gomez, MD, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics and chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, has been named to the second class of fellows at the SUNY Hispanic Leadership Institute (HLI).

6/18/19

Two residents, a fellow and a medical student have been awarded a trio of the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences’ most prestigious awards.

6/14/19
This time of year brings a lot of opportunity to be outside and enjoy the activities we love, but that can sometimes also come with injuries.
6/11/19

Andrew H. Talal, MD — who pioneered the use of telemedicine to treat patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in opioid treatment programs — has shared the successes of this approach with the National Academy of Medicine (NAM).

6/10/19

Nine faculty members with a variety of clinical and research experience — representing five medical school departments — have joined the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences over the past several months.

6/7/19

UB’s Richard Sarkin Medical Emeritus Faculty Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS) has inducted 47 exemplary medical students, residents, fellows and faculty members for 2019.

6/7/19
Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias affect over 50 million people worldwide. Early intervention is crucial. The sooner it's diagnosed, the better the disease's progression can be slowed, allowing for more time with an increased quality of life.